Vatican Announces Commission on Women Deacons

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In a press release issued this morning, the Vatican announced that “after intense prayer and mature reflection,” Pope Francis has established a “Commission of Study on the Diaconate of Women” and named twelve members to it, six of them women, including one American—Professor Phyllis Zagano, who teaches at Hofstra University, Hempstead, N.Y.

Professor Zagano is a widely published author on the subject of women deacons whose writings who have appeared in America.

— Tim Reidy, Gerard O’Connell, August 2, 2016

Read the complete article in America Magazine

Complimentary or Complementary?

ColorI think of myself as “color-challenged.” I don’t often know what color to pick when it comes to shoes or paint or much of anything else, so I resort to the basics of the color wheel.

Limiting myself to the 6 options of the primary and secondary colors, the internal conversation goes something like this. “If the room is blue, then what are the adjacent and opposite colors?” Answers? Green and purple, and orange.

When it comes to leadership culture, I can be equally challenged, but find that I take a similar tack in addressing the question, “What kind of leader do I need to be in this particular situation and for this particular group?”

The summer issue of Harvard Business Review includes a “Defend Your Research” article on how leaders should complement their culture, not embody it. Sort of counter-intuitive, but I’ve seen it in action in my own experience. I find the answer is similar to my color challenge — go with the opposite or complementary skill set.

Does the program or office need someone who is task-oriented to right or steady or focus the ship? Then you are called to bring your organizational and administrative skills to the vision of the ministry so that it can be its most effective.

Does the ministry lack vision or direction, but has lots of great volunteers and doers who are generous and willingly give of their time and talent? Then you need to provide and communicate that vision at every turn, stay out of the proverbial weeds, and help them see how they plug into it and can make it concrete and human.

Start with recognizing your own leadership strengths and which specific skills they naturally support (are “adjacent to”). Then look at which skills are opposite yours — or complement them. How do you bring a balance of these complementary gifts so that your ministry can be the most successful and effective?

 

What Do You Look for in a Leader?

presidentMovies often propose and “try on” the paradigms for leaders that we see and seek in our world.

Last Thursday, PR Web reported on the ten most and worst respected presidents as depicted by Hollywood.

Harrison Ford in “Air Force One” was the #1 best — a president threatened by foreign terror, defending both his family and his country, unwillingly to concede defeat and willing to sacrifice himself for both. A hero in the best sense of the word.

I confess: I love that movie, and I love the Ford’s character in it. As a leader, I aspire to the kind of dedication and willingness to sacrifice that his character embraces.

I’ve seen most of the most respected ones–Michael Douglas (The American President), Robin Williams (Man of the Year), Kevin Kline (Dave–a personal favorite!), and Michael Keaton (First Daughter.)

While these and the others in the top 10 had Ford’s heroic qualities in common, what I truly admire most about these other four is their humanity–a leader who can listen, admit when he is wrong, and stand for what is right; two men who come to see that the office is more important than the man who fills it; a poseur who truly can walk in the shoes of those he is supposedly leading; and a father who learns the hard way what it means to be a father and leader at the same time.

Who do you respect most? Why? Which of these qualities to you try to cultivate in yourself? In others?

Take a Step Off the Soapbox (Rule #7)

speakerMany ministry professionals find themselves advocating for the needs and concerns of the people with and among whom they serve. Advocacy is incredibly important, especially when it is for those who have no voice or whose voices are not heard.

But advocacy without inquiry can become a blaring horn that eventually fades into background white noise.

And when two individuals advocate from opposing positions, they can almost cancel each other out.

In my young adult years, I had the blessing of teaching at an all-girls’ high school. A new teacher–new to the school, new to teaching–I had ideas, great (!) ideas, on how to improve the faith life of the school. And, as you might expect, no one took me seriously.

“You’re new.” “You don’t know what you’re talking about.” “This is the way we have always done it.”

Thankfully, my department chair had the soul of a wise man, and listened very carefully to everything, taking in and storing what might have value sometime in the future.

We spent two years of formal and informal meetings talking through my biggest idea–making all-school Masses optional–possible. And all he did was ask me questions. Lots of them.

Question after question. Why optional? How did we expect the students to respond? What issues would the teachers raise? What strategies did we want to propose to address those strategies? What was our mission-based reasoning? Lots of questions.

About midway through my third year, we met with the administration, and made our proposal. This wasn’t the first time that they had heard this proposal from us, and their faces showed it. So we posed the questions that we had identified, and offered the answers that we had discussed. We invited more questions from them, and responded as best we could.

As it turned out, “as best we could” was good enough.

By combining advocacy with inquiry, we had turned the somewhat inevitable “clash” that many of us experience when pushing a particular program or position into a dialogue by building the bridge from advocacy to inquiry. And we demonstrated right from the start that we had questions, too.

In the end, they agreed with our proposal. (And it was very successful, by the way! More than we had anticipated.)

We had moved advocacy away from being a clanging bell that the administration wanted to silence to a starting point for deeper, greater, and shared advocacy. In the end, campus ministry and the administration were partners promoting a Eucharist-based and -rich faith life in the school. A win-win for everyone.

Turn On the Light

lightThe first two words I heard were “darkness” and “death.”

The various media commentators used these words, reflecting on Mr. Trump’s acceptance speech on Thursday. “Darkness” and “death.”

Our public and political discourse seems to have given voice to a deep-seated anger and frustration that has expressed itself in unkind, even violent (physical and verbal) behaviors.

We have seen “easy” words (“We’re angry”) become “easy” actions (shootings, brawls).

And in direct contrast to that, Jesus said, “I am the light of the world” and “I am the Resurrection and the Life.”

Light and life. Words we cherish and enshrine in a Constitution and Catechism. Actions that we honor with National Medals and canonizations.

Regardless of how dark and angry our environment, businesses, parishes, or Church may become, we are called to be light — always — in the world. To stand up for what is good and right, to model Christ’s response to the darkness and death that he encountered in his world. To offer faith instead of faithlessness, healing instead of pain, a path forward instead of a pit downward.

One of the stories and pictures that has stayed in my mind lately has been that of the protesters who were joined by police — joined, not opposed by.

Faith instead of faithlessness. Healing instead of pain. Forward instead of downward.

Light instead of dark.

Two by Two

twoI’ve heard the Gospel of the sending of the 72 disciples, two by two–frankly, haven’t we all?–so many times over the years. It has never captured my attention like the Passion narrative, parables, or John’s “I AM” discourses. It seemed pedestrian, a set-up to lay the foundation of other passages and what transpired after Jesus’s Resurrection and Ascension.

Until now.

On Sunday, my younger brother was hit by a car while on his bike, trying to avoid another car that was distractedly driving right into him. Like the saying goes, he took it on the chin, breaking his jaw and chin.

Normally, I would have jumped on a plane to be there, but I was already scheduled to jump on another plane to go to the West Coast to see our parents. When we arrived late on Monday, my Mom and I immediately started searching for flights and hotel rooms so that we could turn around and go to him at the hospital the next day.

As the next 48 hours unfolded, we both had this “ah-ha” experience. We couldn’t have done it without the other. While my Mom stayed at my brother’s side, I ran around the city, late at night,trying to get his prescriptions filled so he could be discharged. Sort of a “Martha-Mary” thing. Chicago–where he lives–was my “home town” for many years, and as she said, I know it pretty well. Logistics were my lot. Consolation, empathy, and advocacy were hers. We complemented each other.

We also were there for each other.

We had decisions to make–and we were sounding boards for each other.

We had emotions to express–and we had the other’s shoulder to cry on and ear to bend.

Two by two. That is how we are sent into the world. Two by two keeps up balanced. Two by two tempers anxiety and fosters humility, not egoism. Two by two reminds us that we are not alone.

#TheDukePriest on What Young People Say About Jesus

ONE16 FR MIKE lowMAC is honored to welcome Fr. Mike Martin, OFM Conv, former president and principal of Baltimore’s very own Archbishop Curley High School and now director of the Newman Center at Duke University, as one of our featured mega-workshop speakers.

Fr. Mike is bringing his years of experience with interacting with young men and women in school environments to the topic of what they are saying to each other about Jesus.

In a world that favors the succinctness of a tweet or the uniformity of a #, what does the conversation sound like when young people discuss the Son of God?  Since our peers remain one of the most influential groups in our lives, let’s explore how millennials are being disciples and evangelizers to each other in an age that may need them more than ever.

What do the millenials in your family, among your friends and colleagues, in your parish or school — how do they approach the question of who Jesus, the Son of God, is? What questions do their conversations raise for you?

 

 

Rule #2: Share All Relevant Information

When sharing information, I’m pretty much the queen of starting with A, then B, and then jumping to J, K, and L, and finishing right with T. With all of those gaps in between, no wonder I get blank stares or long, silent pauses once I stop speaking.

It isn’t intentional. At least, not consciously. The adage that “information is power” is frighteningly true, but many of us withhold information out of negligence rather than malice.

To break the habit, try these 4 things.Board's Role

  1. List out the information that you are trying to share. Then go back and ask yourself the journalist’s 5 “W’s”–who, what, where, when, why,–plus “how.” Anticipate the information that you may be excluding.
  2. Practice a conversational style where you encourage your colleague or partner to question you about the information you have shared. It’s important to realize that what you think is relevant might not be relevant to them, and vice versa.
  3. If you have newsprint or a board available, map out the information. Start with the central piece of information you are sharing, then draw lines extending outward. On each line walk through–as a group–what additional information is needed to fully understand the information. Keep adding sublines until you all agree that what you have is complete. (See “mindmaps” for a great illustration of this.”
  4. Practice a little humility, and confess straight out that you know you will forget to share something, and give your colleagues permission to ask questions as they need to.

 

The Rules: Important Words

fenceOne of the most stressful parts of a new job for me has always been learning the “rules” of how the office works, how people interact, what is expected of me, and what I should expect of others.

One boss I had did our entire staff the great favor of inviting a consultant in, and teaching us a set of rules to work by. They weren’t magic words, but when adhered to, they eliminated some potential landmines, reduced tensions, and made it possible to work through conflicts.

This post is one of a series of posts featuring each rule.

Rule #1: Agree on what important words mean.

A word like “rules.” Is a rule only in writing or can they be “unwritten”? I once worked in an office where the unwritten rule was to never question when the supervisor arrived at work even though it was often hours after everyone else.

An important tool in discovering what the important words are is to listen carefully to how colleagues phrase questions and even what they complain about.

A friend and colleague taught me a lot about the first. I had pulled together the text for a resource, and had gotten to the point where I was no longer a good judge of how good or bad it was or what was highlighted well and what was missing. So, I asked, “Can you give me some feedback on this now?” as I extended a printed copy to her.

Her response was fabulous! “Do you want whatever I can tell you now or do you want my best response?” She taught me about how important it is to be specific, especially in my questions.

Same office, different colleague on complaints. “It isn’t perfect.” Surely something we have all heard ourselves say as some point in time. At that point in time, striving for perfection was slowly killing us, partly because we all had slightly different definitions of. Me? I’m good with anywhere between 95-98% perfect. Not so my colleagues.

After a brief discussion, we arrived at a new and common definition of “perfection.” We decided that we were striving for excellence, not perfection, and recognized what some of the boundaries are around achieving excellence.

So, what key words are essential in the culture of your office? What do you think they mean? What else could they mean?

 

Ties That Bind

DallasOne of the advantages of working from home is that when major news events happen, I have the freedom to be present when they are live.

The interfaith memorial service for the 5 men who died in Dallas last Thursday was one of those such occasions.

President Obama’s reflection repeated the phrase, “We know this . . . ”

As a leader, he reminded us all that we only know the experience of others when we have empathy, when we can stand in the feet of another. It is that ability that binds us to each other and ultimately allows us to hope — to hope with our God who assures us He will be with us in all of the highs and lows of our lives.