Tag Archives: decision

What Problems Are You Trying to Solve? Part II

Besides my weedy gardens, the onset of warmer, more humid weather brought another new problem to the fore — our air conditioning didn’t work.

When you live in a part of the country that began as a swamp, summer means air that veritably drips with condensation that never quite turns into rain. A/C is a necessity — and so the quest for repair service began.

As luck would have it, we received a discount coupon in the mail from a heating/air conditioning company for a system check-up. After looking at our A/C, the conversation with the repairman went something like this.

“Now, if you will let me just do the service, I can charge you the $29 from the ad.”

“But didn’t you say that we need to replace the A/C.”

“Yes, but IF YOU WILL LET ME JUST DO THE SERVICE . . . ”

“Ohhhhh, then you can charge me the $29, and send someone else out to do the rest?”

“Right!!!”

I’m not usually so clueless, but his point was well taken. We thought we had a leak problem since we’d been in this situation before. But he had redefined the problem–appropriately so–and now the question was how best to solve it?

I solve most “big ticket” issues the same way–contact multiple experts, collect lots of information, compare prices, then make a decision. With A/C or new doors, my solo search might work, but in ministry, not so much.

The center of the above process is “I.” And in ministry, an “I” is best when part of a “we.” There’s good reason for that. Ministry is always about the community — the participation of, the impact on, and the ownership of the problem and solution.

So, unlike caring for a house, in ministry, problems shouldn’t be solved by one person. But you’ve probably had similar experiences trying to motivate a committee or team to solve a familiar or repeated problem.

Don’t let that stop you. Though your group may be moving slowly or not at all, a change in or from one person can completely change the direction or orientation of the whole towards the problem and solution. That person can be you.

So what can you do? Make a change in your own behavior related to the problem.

Instead of advocating for a particular approach, start asking everyone else how they would handle it. Don’t let them get away with saying that your idea is fine. Gently push them to tell you what they would do (or what they have done in a similar situation.)

Or create multiple options and lead the group in an evaluation of them. Don’t contribute a single opinion until someone either asks or everyone has talked. You are there to lead.

Or do something really crazy — pass out post-it notes or index cards. Ask folks to write down every possible idea for how to solve the problem, from the sublime to the ridiculous. Try speaking in a different language (really! Spanish or charades — and no, I am not kidding!)

 

Or just do something, anything that is totally different from what you would otherwise do. Don’t feed into people’s expectations of how the problem will be solved.

Group dynamics remind us that when one person in a group changes their behavior, everyone else must change theirs too. Creating this kind of energy and ownership will move you forward, even through the rough spots, and lead you to different solutions to the problems that you face.