Tag Archives: vision

The Price of “Think” Time–Part 2

At what cost do you spend your thinking time doing — literally, just doing something, anything?

A couple of years ago, I realized that I was spending every waking hour at my desk answering emails, creating flyers, responding to someone else’s issues or concerns, and not getting any of the deep thinking that I needed to be doing.

What is “deep thinking”? For me, it is stepping back and looking at a project or program at a distance. Putting some distance between all of the pieces that I am involved with and the mission or goals of the project to examine whether or not they are going in the same direction.

It’s asking the mission question — is what I/we are doing fulfilling our mission or just filling time?

It’s wondering about how this program or project fits in with the larger strategic vision of my organization (or your parish or school or diocese). If it is, how? How are we falling short?

Is the amount of time I spend on this project commensurate with the potential good that comes out of it? If not, why and what should change?

Mondays and Fridays are my big picture think days, especially in the morning, now.

What chunk of time can you regularly carve out to do the deep thinking that your ministry really needs to thrive and sustain itself?

It’s the Journey

path(Follow up to last week’s post.)

Second phrase that sticks in my mind is, “It’s the journey.”

One of the stories that you hear repeatedly in Santiago di Campostela–and you see the evidence of it–is of pilgrims who have made the trek along any of the Camino routes, have arrived in Santiago, and are struck by the thought, “So, now what?”

We heard a lot about the how the Camino, especially the most well-known route starting in France and winding its was through Northern Spain has changed. Movies like “The Way” have popularized the journey along the Camino all over, but especially among Americans. It has become an item on many “bucket lists.”

So it isn’t surprising that the end point might have an unsettling, unsatisfactory, and even empty feel to it.

Bucket lists are for checking off — setting an objective and accomplishing it. Being able to say that you did that — like sky diving (remember when that was at the top of the lists of “things to accomplish in my life.”)

Focusing on the Camino as an accomplishment neglects and ignores its basic nature — as a journey. Getting there is good, but how we get there is even more important.

I remember a number of years ago listening to a reading from the first chapter in the Book of Joshua, which starts by telling us that Moses has died before he and the people can cross over the Jordan into the Promised Land. The monologue going on in my head was immersed in the idea that Moses must have been disappointed to have come so far, but not been able to make the final step. As I think back on it, I realize how the 40 year journey was the focus of Moses’ life and leadership, not the destination. Reaching the destination was for another.

But the journey. That was Moses.

Let’s start by admitting that we are focused on a destination (e.g., goal, objective, “bucket list” item) in some way, shape, or form as leaders. Take a look at your list. Wallow in the kudos or endorphins you expect at the end when whatever it is is completed.

Now that we have gotten that out of the way, set that aside and let’s look at what the journey to that destination is and will be like. What are the gifts and charisms that you need for the journey? How do they differ from what you will need once you reach the destination? How comfortable are you with letting someone else lead the last steps or take over once you are there?

Be a Better Leader in the Next 5 Minutes

  1. Set a vision. Create a memorable vision statement for your team or company that states the problem you want to solve, how yo plan to solve it, and why it matters.
  2. Above all else, be clear. “Clarity always results in influence, which is the essence of leadership,” says Andy Stanley. People say they want to follow leaders with integrity, but more often end up following those who are clear. Be a leader who exhibits both qualities.
  3. Understand and communicate the “why.” You can’t have an effective vision to share with your team unless you understand why you do what you do. . .
  4. Be repetitive. “Vision leaks; it doesn’t stick,” says Stanley. Refer to your vision often and in a conversational way, so you–and eventually your team–immediately relate all decision back to the vision.
  5. Reward your people honestly. Stanley suggests “celebrating vision systematically.” In other words, when a team member creates a win for your event, make it known to the individual and the team that that’s the type of win you’re looking for. “What’s rewarded is repeated,” says Stanley.

— Andy Stanley, speaker to leaders at Infinite Energy Arena, as recorded in Connect: The Faith and Work Issue, Summer 2016, p. 17, faith.connectmeetings.com

 

Striving for What Could Be (Part 2)

objectsMy graduate strategies professor taught us his proprietary method that is based on three questions, the first of which is, “What do you got?”

Though intended for secular and for-profit industries, I find the question rivetingly helpful when thinking about strategy in a ministry or non-profit setting.

This question forces me to look at the resources in front of me — personnel, budget, physical materials. And to look at the reality of them. My budget is limited to what my budget is. Period. In my office, “personnel” is me, not the 2nd or 3rd person I wish I could hire. Just me.

Interesting thing. As soon as I started looking at “what I got,” I started to see things that I didn’t realize I had. Plus I could see how different pieces fit together in ways I hadn’t expected.

That’s when the “could be” started to emerge. And all because I looked deeply into what I already had.

Acknowledge What Is (Part 1)

stepsThere is a dialectic between what is (e.g., reality) and what could be.

As Ecclesiastes reminds us, there is a time for everything, including a time to acknowledge what is, the reality, and recognize it for what it is — in all its messiness, creativity, craziness, lack, and fullness.

As leaders, we try to uphold our strategies and visions with every might of energy we have. But there is a time when it is important and necessary to acknowledge what is before us — the reality, what “is.”

The reality before us is the first step toward what could be. Until we see and accept what is, we have no hope of achieving what could be.