What Problems Are You Trying to Solve? Part I

My husband and I live on a half acre plot of land. In an effort to reduce the amount of grass that he has to cut, we have planted gardens in large patches around the house and in the back yard.

In solving one problem, it seems I created another. “BG” (“before gardens”), my aversion to weeds was easily controllable with regular sprays of a good weed-killer or an hour or two of weeding. Now? I feel one with the plants that are being overwhelmed by the towering and tangling weeds that want to bury the actual plant residents of the gardens.

With the break in the parish and school year, it’s a good time to reflect on what  problems are you trying to solve?

Is your focus on the right problems or just the ones in front of you?

I thought the weeds were my problem. A landscaper (who I ultimately hired) showed me the error of my ways. The landscaping fabric that I had had laid the previous year was the actual culprit of my weed problem. He told me that as long as the fabric was there, regardless of how much he sprayed the weeds, they would keep coming back.

Think about one or two of the problems that you are hoping to address over the summer. What’s the surface problem? How is it presenting itself? Who and what are involved?

Then, like a good weed, take a second look and see if you can find the root of the problem.

As a former teacher, it used to drive me crazy when students would forget to turn in homework. It took me about 3 semesters to realize that the homework itself wasn’t the problem. My students weren’t organized enough to remember to do it! Solve the organization problem, and the homework may actually get done.

Most of our problems are like a garden. If you want to kill the weed, you have to have the patience and perseverance to kill the root. Otherwise, you pull the weed, only to have it return again.

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